From the Editor’s desk: Saying goodbye to my role as Editor-in-Chief

Originally published in Issue 14, Fifty-First Year of The Minstrel (May 4, 2017). 

I almost never joined The Minstrel.

I came into DeSales thinking I wanted to be an advertising copywriter and had no intention of pursuing journalism as a career. I became a staff writer on The Minstrel a couple weeks into freshman year to make friends and get involved in the school. I thought it might be difficult to handle the extra work, but I decided to try it out.

Looking back, I’d like to pat my freshman-self on the back for making that decision because this paper has created a passion in me to investigate facts, interview people and tell their stories.

Overall, The Minstrel has been one of the most impactful things I’ve done here. It’s taught me bravery, leadership and how to accept criticism.

When I accepted my position as Editor-in-Chief last year, I had no idea how I was going to fill 14 issues. I knew I wanted to bring controversial topics to The Minstrel but I wasn’t sure what topics or how. This year is when I really got into the mindset that everything can be turned into a story and my gears were always turning for new ideas.

I also moved away from editorials this year since I have this great “Letter from the Editor’s desk” where I can write anything I want—which has been an absolute pleasure—and started focusing on hard news.

I am proud of my staff and myself for covering many weighty topics such as sexual assault, LGBT rights, mental health, sex trafficking and politics. We’ve opened up diverse conversations on a campus where these conversations were previously lacking or nonexistent.

It has specifically been great to witness the evolvement of the non-discrimination policy, which I first covered in November, and to now see that the decision to add “sexual orientation” is going to the Board. (Read the article out on Page 1.)

In addition to improving article content, we added the “Editorial” section and editor position. In previous years, there would only be an Editorial Page when there were enough articles to fill a page; however, this year we made sure to devote at least one page an issue to editorials.

We changed the masthead design, fonts and other layout changes such as photo stories to approve the paper’s appeal. Additionally, we cut the full puzzle page to either a quarter page to sometimes nonexistent in order to cover more content for our readers.

I have many people I would like to thank for their support at DeSales. First, I would like to thank The Minstrel staff for putting up with my perfectionist attitude when it comes to editing articles. It was a pleasure working with Managing Editor Will Edwards and all the other editors by my side. I know they will all have great success in the future. I wish Chris Shaddock the best of luck as Editor-in-Chief for the next two years. The enthusiasm you have for journalism will take The Minstrel to great places and I can’t wait to see the paper continue to evolve.

I’d like to thank The Minstrel’s advisor Professor McKnight for being an inspiration to me as a journalist and always helping me out of the hot water I often created; Dr. Grasso for bringing out the feminist in me, always chatting with me in her office and challenging me academically to be the best I could be; and all the other professors I’ve had an honor of meeting at DeSales who have shown their support for me in some way.

I couldn’t have made it through the past four years without my communication right hand (wo)man Erin Grube. (They’ll miss us roaming the Humanities hallway next year.) Thanks for being a friend to me since freshman year and helping me learn that it’s okay to not be
perfect.

Thank you to my best friend Skye Van Hook—who “doesn’t even go here”—but has shown so much support and encouragement for my articles on social media that you would think she did. She believes in me and my talent more than I believe in myself.

And thank you Tina Tran, the nicest person I know, for attending almost every DeSales event with me. It’s been a memorable four years and I know we will keep the random road trips coming.

Last, but not least I’d like to thank my mom, dad and Katie for reading ALL of my articles over the past four years; there’s been a lot.

Even as a commuter, DeSales was a second home to me. I will tremendously miss this place and the kind-hearted people I’ve met here, but I know I’ll be back to visit.

Although the future ahead of me remains uncertain, I know I’ll be writing. I’d like to take my investigative journalistic skills to the real world and continue to fight for justice in my articles.

I leave you with a quote from one of my favorite TV shows, “Pretty Little Liars,” that is also about to come to an end.

“How lucky am I to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard?”—Spencer Hastings

Peace, love & DeSales,

Kellie Dietrich
Editor-in-Chief

Playing with Fire

Originally published in the Weal (2017), DeSales University’s literary magazine. 

Like fire destroying a house
your eyes burn into mine,
enveloping me into the flames.

It’s only a second or two,
nothing more,
But I can still feel the intensity in your gaze
before you turn and walk away.

You used to pull me close to you,
kiss my neck,
bite my lips,
intertwine our fingers together.

And just like that,
as fast as you pulled me to you
or grabbed my hand,
you shove me away.

There is no more you and I,
no more things that could have been.
There is only you.
And there is me.

Scorched and scarred is how you leave me,
staring at the ashes
of when there was a we,
an us.

So now,
I look at you,
I can’t touch you.
You will burn me.

Cyber criminals target college students with phishing, employment scams, ransomware

Originally published in Issue 14, Fifty-First Year of The Minstrel (May 4, 2017). 

Cyber criminals are increasingly targeting college students across the United States and DeSales students are no exception from phishing, employment offers and ransomware scams.

The National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) reports that 72 percent of Americans believe their accounts are secure with only usernames and passwords, but every two seconds there is another victim of identity fraud.

The end goal for these criminals is to gain personal information such as birth dates, Social Security numbers, bank accounts and more. This personal information can then be sold for money on the Dark Web, which allows users to remain anonymous and untraceable from getting into legal trouble.

Besides money and personal information, .edu emails can be valuable in order to gain access or discounts to software and other products reserved for members of a university community, which is why technical school email addresses are most often the targets of attacks. However when broken down by state, the largest number of emails being sold on the Dark Web come from California, New York, Michigan, Texas and Pennsylvania.

Phishing

Phishing, the fraudulent practice of sending emails in order to gain personal information, is the most common type of scam at DeSales.

A lot of DeSales students have fallen for password reminder scams. One of these emails told students to renew their password by clicking a link that actually went to christmastourhouse.com.

According to Director of Information Technology Patricia Clay, it is very easy to fake the name that is seen on email addresses. A cyber criminal could easily make the email name read “Help Desk” or “DeSales” but if the address bar is hovered over, it will then read christmastourhouse.com or some other website not related to DeSales.

“We haven’t seen very sophisticated attacks, but in some of the more sophisticated attacks, it’ll pretend that it’s Bank of America and actually copy Bank of America’s logos and put it on their e-mails,” said Clay.

“It’s almost always a bad practice to click that link from an email if you’re not 100 percent sure that you should,” Clay added.

IT usually finds out about the scam through students reporting it or through monitoring.

Once IT is aware that students have responded to a phishing scam, the account is disabled and the password is changed. Then IT reaches out to the student whose account was comprised and has a conversation with them to find out what happened.

With company websites that have been compromised, criminals have lists of email addresses and can check which emails are still actively being used to login to websites. Criminals sell these emails and passwords on the Dark Web.

“They take that list of username and password combinations and they script that to go log in to different websites,” said Clay.

For example, if a criminal has a Yahoo username and password, they will then check that username and password on any other websites with logins such as Facebook or bank accounts.

Although awareness about phishing is increasing, victims keep falling for the scams.

“As long as phishing scams are still successful, they’ll keep doing it,” said Clay.

Employment scams

Job scams are an ongoing epidemic that received FBI attention in January 2017. Stop. Think. Connect., a global online safety campaign, sent the FBI’s warning on employment scams that target college students to DeSales IT.

The scammers pose as employers and send job postings to students about a remote job. Then they send the student a counterfeit check in the mail and tell the student to cash the check. With that cash, the student is asked to buy a money order and send it to a certain address.

Often times the check does not come up as fraudulent until the bank processes it and by then the student may have already lost money in sending the money order.

Earlier this year, a job scam occurred with someone named Susana Ozoria sending a job announcement email for a personal assistant through Bulldogs 4 Hire.

Assistant Director of the Career Development Center Melanie Vallone explains that the email came through Bulldogs 4 Hire (desales@csm. symplicity.com) because the employer created a fraudulent email address and posed as a legitimate company to create a Bulldogs 4 Hire account.

Vallone says three or four students received the check in the mail with one student coming very close to sending the money order. This incident was the first and only breach through Bulldogs 4 Hire.

“What makes it really tough is that we promote Bulldogs 4 Hire as a great way to post your resume—and safely—because it’s almost job search while you sleep. Employers can look if you’ve made your resume visible to employers,” said Vallone. “That’s when I work really hard to make sure employers are legitimate viable employers that are looking at our student resumes.”

Vallone calls up many local employers to make sure real people at their companies requested accounts on Bulldogs 4 Hire.

According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), companies are increasingly becoming targets of scams as well with cyber criminals posing as company executives or the government and asking for W-2s, which contain Social Security numbers, dates of birth, addresses and other personal identifiable information.

Ransomware

“Ransomware is where somebody tricks you into opening, usually a document or a file that has software in it, and what it does, is it encrypts files on whatever computers or computer you have access to,” said Clay.

After this occurs, a message pops up on the computer ordering the person to pay a certain amount of money in Bitcoins, an online currency, within a certain amount of time. The threat is made that if the deadline is not met, all the files will be permanently inaccessible.

This is when Clay hopes that the person regularly backs up their files and can ignore the ransomware. Unfortunately, some hospitals have paid the ransom in order to obtain access to patients’ records.

“I haven’t heard of cases where people pay the ransom and don’t get their files decrypted, but again, you’re dealing with a criminal,” said Clay, so someone could send the money and not get the files back.

DeSales did have a ransomware incident where a student received an email that looked like it was from their own personal account with a word document inside.

Ultimately, the cyber security industry hopes that artificial intelligence will aid in picking up suspicious emails.

Protection against scams

IT protects the network by keeping a good encryption between the systems students interact with. There are multiple levels of firewalls and segmented networks.

“I want the next generation of our students going out into the world and not be the people falling for phishing scams at their jobs,” said Clay.

She reiterates that students need to have a lot of skepticism. When students are not sure if emails are legitimate or not, students can forward emails to spam@desales.edu; however, “when in doubt, delete it,” said Clay.

If a password is compromised, be sure to make sure that password is not used for any other login or that site can be comprised as well.

Students should use a different password for everything and although that sounds like a difficult feat, free password-manager websites and apps, such as LastPass and 1Password, allows all of a student’s passwords to be stored in one place.

Strong authentication, also known as multi-factor or two- factor authentication, is a great tool to utilize as well. Many websites and apps offer this to protect accounts and ensure it’s the account owner, not criminals, accessing the account.

The three most common types of strong authentication are by using a security key (a small device, such as one that plugs into a USB port, to use when logging in), biometrics (such as fingerprints or cameras) and one-time codes (sent to you by a text or through an app to be entered into the website when logging in).

In the case of job searches, always be skeptical of offers that sound too good to be true. If the email says the recipient already has the job, when he or she never applied or was interviewed, the recipient should not respond. Many of the scammers are not native English speakers so look for poor grammar and spelling. Any companies asking for personal information are red flags as well.

Vallone suggests that when posting resumes on public sites like Indeed or LinkedIn to only list cities and states. Do not post full physical addresses online.

Overall, the more people become connected to the Internet, the more ways there are for scammers to find them so it is increasingly important to be skeptical and know how to protect personal information.

Gender isn’t just about women, feminism is equal rights for all

Originally published in the Humanities Newsletter 2017 edition.

The Gender Studies Club, better known as The Birkenstocks, was created at DeSales University in the spring of 2016.

“The goal is to talk about current topics that come up in the media and share opinions in an open space where there is no judgment,” said Jennifer Thuss, Birkenstocks president.

Currently, the club is all women, but members encourage men to join.

“It seems like an intimidating thing for guys to want to join because there’s this perception that gender means female, but that’s not true. Gender includes everyone,” said Dr. Katherine Grasso, the club’s advisor and communication professor. “So the more voices that we could have in these conversations, the more we could learn. And the more that we reflect on gender and what that means for each individual, the more I think we understand different experiences, and hopefully work on compassion, equality and justice in terms of gender issues.”

The club was formed after Grasso taught a gender communication course in fall of 2015.

“At the end of the semester, a handful of students, about five or six of them, said that they didn’t want the conversations to end so they asked if we could meet outside of class.”

The students were the catalyst of the club and Grasso happily agreed to be their advisor. The Birkenstocks meet every other Tuesday to discuss articles or documentaries on issues related to gender such as rape, sex, prostitution, transgendered issues, abortion, and stereotypes of men and women.

Birkenstocks

Some of the members of the Gender Studies Club. From left to right: Nadia Murray, Erin Grube, Jennifer Thuss, Lauren Trumbull, Kellie Dietrich and Dr. Katherine Grasso.

Earlier this year, members watched the documentary “Fantastic Lies” about the Duke lacrosse team who were falsely accused of gang rape.

“It was interesting because I thought they did it, and I felt bed after because I had the stereotype in my mind that they partied too hard. And the fact that they hired a prostitute made them look guilty even though they weren’t,” said Erin Grube, treasurer of Birkenstocks.

Articles and documentaries, which often break down stereotypes or offers new viewpoints such as “Fantastic Lies,” are picked by suggestions from Grasso or members of the club. Although the topics are heavy and members often have conflicting views, the club is always welcoming.

The atmosphere is so much fun,” said Thuss. “It’s usually upbeat, but when we are talking about harder topics it’s serious, and by the end we always bring it back to something fun.”

One of the fun yet serious elements of the club is its name Birkenstocks, or Birks for short.

“Birkenstocks, I think most people know, are one of the stereotypical symbols of an angry, hairy, man-hating, Subaru-driving feminist,” said Grasso. “We wanted to reclaim something that had previously been rooted in a negative evaluation and make it something that we owned and that was positive and that was funny.”

There is a lot of rhetoric around the word “feminism” such as man-hating and angry women, which simply isn’t true.

“Feminism is the advocacy of equal rights between the genders in terms of social issues, political issues, and economic issues, so it’s really advocacy of the equality of the sexes,” said Grasso.

Grube has a similar definition of feminism.

“A feminist is someone who wants equal rights between men and women,” she said. “I’m for that and believe there should be no disparities between the genders.”

A lot of the stereotypical views of feminists come from media portrayals of radical women burning bras; however, knowledge is lacking as well.

“I think it’s rooted in not understanding it or not knowing it, which is all the more reason for people to talk about it and explore it,” said Grasso. “So it’s not a club saying you have to be a feminist to be part of the conversation, but you have to be willing to challenge your preconceived notions about feminism.”

Overall, the club fosters unique discussion about gender issues and the members of the club bring unique perspectives to the table.

Grasso encourages anyone who’s curious about gender, even if they don’t know what gender really means, to join.

“I really enjoy this club and the group of people in it. It’s a safe environment where we can share our ideas that we might not be able to share anywhere else,” said Thuss. “This is only the second year for the club so I see a lot of growth possible and I’m looking forward to seeing where it goes in the future.”

DeSales faculty votes “sexual orientation” should be added to non-discrimination policy

Originally published in Issue 14, Fifty-First Year of The Minstrel (May 4, 2017). 

At the April faculty meeting, 77 percent of the faculty voted in favor of adding “sexual orientation” to the Notice of Non-discrimination found in the faculty and student handbooks. However, the final decision is up to the Board of Trustees.

This vote closely mirrors the statistic from the Public Religion Research Institute that found 76 percent of Catholics favor laws protecting LGBT people from discrimination.

The lack of protection for LGBT students and faculty was first brought to the Faculty Steering Committee about a year ago and the conversation continued into this academic year.

A new version of the non- discrimination policy was drafted with the only difference being the addition of the two words “sexual orientation.” A total of 97 faculty members attended the meeting and voted anonymously with a secret ballot. The results revealed 72 faculty members voted in favor of the policy change, 24 members opposed the change and one person abstained from voting.

“I was elated,” said instructor Larry Belt after he heard the results. “I could breathe deeper, I could stand taller. I felt like something had been accomplished and a weight had been lightened.”

Although the decision to include “sexual orientation” is not finalized yet, it is really about the voice of the faculty being heard. The February faculty meeting revolved around opposition to the policy, which was mostly based in the teachings of the Catholic Church. The March meeting was cancelled, and supporters of the policy change were now ready to speak at the April meeting.

“The opportunity for it to be discussed really opened the door to people willing to speak in favor of it,” said Belt.

In their hearts, Belt said, people knew which way they were going to vote and whether or not that matches with the way they live.

“If it opened up that way for the faculty, I think about if there were an open forum for students that it would be the same thing,” he said.

If an open forum about LGBT concerns is held at DeSales, students will be able to discuss their positions and needs. This could then lead to the formation of a Gay Straight Alliance (GSA), which is a student-run club that offers support and a safe environment to the LGBT community.

Sidewalk Critics

Originally published in the Weal (2017), DeSales University’s literary magazine. 

She keeps her head low
to avoid eye contact
from the strangers walking by.

But she is very aware
of those around her.
They judge her
while she mistrusts them.

They whistle.

Eyes sweep up and down her body,
examining her looks,
her petite size,
that could easily be overtaken.

So she walks faster,
heels click the sidewalk louder.
Her fingers grip the cold metal keys harder.

She unlocks the door.

Inside of her car,
her muscles relax.
She finally…

exhales.

Students present on body image, sexual assault at LVAIC Women & Gender Studies conference

Originally published in Issue 13, Fifty-First Year of The Minstrel (April 13, 2017). Click here to view the entire issue.

Senior Jennifer Thuss and junior Lauren Trumbull, both communication majors at DeSales University, presented at the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges (LVAIC) annual Women & Gender Studies conference on Saturday, March 25 at Muhlenberg College.

Students from LVAIC schools, which include Cedar Crest College, DeSales University, Lafayette College, Lehigh University, Moravian College and Muhlenberg College, along with Albright College and Kutztown University, presented research papers, videos, artwork, photography, poetry and dances.

GenderConf

Presenters Lauren Trumbull (far left) and Jennifer Thuss (second from the right) are supported by their friends Kimberly Semiday (second from the left) and Nadia Murray (far right). Photo courtesy of Dr. Katherine Grasso

Thuss and Trumbull both presented research papers that they wrote in their gender communication class from last semester. Thuss’s paper was “The Effects of Media Images on Young Girls” and she presented in the “Visual Culture” panel.

Thuss chose this topic because it’s something she’s always been passionate about throughout college. The main idea of her paper was how the media portrays bodies as unrealistic, which can have negative outcomes on young girls.

She hopes what audience members took away from her presentation is “that models in the media do not always look as they do in the picture,” said Thuss. “Photoshopping can completely change the appearance. Also, that media exposure should be limited for young girls since they are most susceptible to the images at a young age.”

Trumbull’s research paper was also a heavy topic, entitled “Sexual Assault on College Campuses and Its Effects on Reporting.” She presented in the “Gendered Bodies” panel.

Her presentation included statistics, such as that only 75 percent of colleges and universities have a procedure in place for reporting sexual assault. She explained victims aren’t reporting “because they know their documentation won’t result in punishment for the perpetrator.”

Trumbull also discussed the implementation of the Clery Act, which was put into place by the government and requires academic institutions to disclose data regarding campus crimes every year.

She explained how institutions skew their data to hide the real numbers of sexual assault on campuses. Other major points of her presentation included the impact of fraternities and sororities on hyper-masculinity, traditional gender roles and believing in rape myths.

After watching the documentary “The Hunting Ground” on sexual assault for her gender communication course, Trumbull knew she wanted to focus on this topic for her paper.

“Watching this documentary shocked and horrified me,” she said. “It made me realize that I wanted more information on this issue so that I could learn more and maybe someday help make the statistics on sexual assault drop.”

Trumbull hopes audience members learned that sexual assault on college campus is a major problem and conversations are needed to fix that problem.

“We need to be open and honest and facilitate an environment in which victims feel comfortable to disclose their assault,” said Trumbull. “We need to start punishing our perpetrators and send the message that sexual assault is not at all acceptable, and that the victim is never to blame.”

Thuss and Trumbull both enjoyed meeting other presenters at the conference who also shared an interest in gender studies.

“I was surrounded by mostly women—maybe one or two men—that are intelligent and kind, and worked so hard to present on what they are passionate about,” said Trumbull.

“All of the women were nothing but supportive and gave me the sweetest compliments after I presented,” she added. “The environment was just overall proud. We were proud of each other for standing up and speaking and proud of ourselves for having the courage to do it.”

Thuss, who is also president of The Birkenstocks (gender club), was inspired by a presentation on an online blog called Her Campus, a global online community for college women.

“They explained how it worked and how to bring it to DeSales so I think it’s definitely something that the gender club will look into starting,” said Thuss.

Additionally, Thuss, Trumbull and Nadia Murray, all members of The Birkenstocks, plus senior Kimberly Semiday, volunteered at the conference by checking in guests and participants, and stuffing their welcome bags.

Next spring, the annual Women & Gender Studies conference will be held at DeSales with Dr. Katherine Grasso, communication professor and Birkenstocks advisor, serving as the conference chair.

Muslim student Ayesha Riaz’s powerful message

Originally published in Issue 13, Fifty-First Year of The Minstrel (April 13, 2017). Click here to view the entire issue.

Ayesha

Photo courtesy of Ayesha Riaz

Senior biology major Ayesha Riaz embodied bravery and courage as the only Muslim student to compete for the Academic Excellence Address this year.

Due to the anti-Muslim sentiment that is present around the world today, Riaz felt fear being the only Pakistani, Muslim student competing in a competition that was primarily white, Catholic students.

Riaz moved to the United States from Pakistan two years ago. She struggled with having to learn English and becoming accustomed to the cultural differences in the U.S. She plans for a future in the medical field as a physician assistant and knew she would need English to succeed, so she challenged herself and taught herself English.

During her struggles with the language, she never imagined having the opportunity to compete for the Academic Excellence Address.

“The presence of my professors on the day of the speech to support me, gave me a sense of strength and energy, which I probably can’t express in words,” said Riaz.

Riaz’s speech explained her adjustment from moving from Pakistan to the U.S.

“The gist of my speech was, ‘We can conquer the world following the virtues of perseverance.’ We can achieve whatever we desire in life if we’re hard working, determined, honest and respectful to those who have taught us,” said Riaz.

After the first round of the competition was over, Riaz was unsure if she would move on to the next round, and was moved with emotions to hear that she made it through.

“I was uncertain about how much support I might receive because I am a Muslim student in these uncertain times,” she said. “But the result announcement brought tears in my eyes and totally changed my perspective about DeSales’ faculty and made me feel proud that I became a part of this institution where decisions are made on the basis of capabilities and talent, and not on the basis of race and religion.”

Screen Shot 2017-04-14 at 8.40.12 PM

“So many people have shown me compassion and love, and I realized that they really care about me and they don’t consider me a bad person as being a Muslim,” Riaz adds.

Riaz had two main reasons for competing in the Academic Excellence Address. She recalls her first day at DeSales in the admissions office where she saw a photo of Madame Benazir Bhutto, the 12th Prime Minister of Pakistan and the first Muslim woman to head a Muslim majority nation.

“She lectured in DeSales University once, and that was such an inspiring moment to me,” said Riaz. “So I prayed to God, and I want to see my photo or name plaque on the wall of this intuition as a Muslim woman due to my accomplishments.”

Her other main reason for competing was to be able to express her thoughts and thank the people who have helped her succeed at DeSales the past two years.

“I really could not have accomplished all this without their help and support. So, this speech was just a way to pay tribute to all those people especially my family and teachers who have helped me going through tough times,” she said.

Riaz made it to the second round of the competition where she delivered her speech to the Academic Oversight Committee, which is made up of the five division heads; the deans of undergraduate education, graduate education and lifelong learning; and the Provost.

Junior pharmaceutical marketing major Jenna Haydt was selected the winner of the competition and will be giving the Academic Excellence Address at the Academic Excellence Celebration on Sunday, April 23 at 1:30 p.m. in Connelly Chapel. She will be awarded a prize of $500.

Lastly, Riaz wishes DeSales would have a club specifically for Muslim or International students who move to the U.S. in order to help them with the different cultural, religious and academic backgrounds they are exposed to and make their transition easier.

“In the end, I would like to say, I love this institution and I wish I could stay here longer, but this institution taught me way beyond my expectations and made me a strong and confident person who can now confront all challenges,” said Riaz.

 

April Fools: DSU PD breaks up St. Patty’s Day party, finds a leprechaun

Originally published in Issue 12, Fifty-First Year of The Minstrel (March 30, 2017). 

Once upon a freezing Friday night, a lucky four-leaf clover was buried under a foot of snow. Students clad with green walked right by it to the party, never knowing it was there.

This was not the “luck o’ the Irish” kind of night.

At approximately 11:00 p.m. on St. Patrick’s Day, campus PD busted into Finnegan, the more Irish sounding of the two villas, to break up a party featuring your typical green beer and the cheapest vodka college students can afford.

“When the police showed up, I said, ‘You’ve got the wrong holiday. This isn’t Halloween,’” said freshman Scott Land. “Then I realized it was campus PD and I was out the window faster than you can say, ‘supercalifragilisticexpialidocious.’”

Most students were not fast enough to make it out the window, and the police wrote up 37 students.

“The cops took our names and now I have to pay a fine plus complete community service for underage drinking,” said sophomre Al Coholic.

“The party was definitely worth it though. Everyone who’s anyone was there,” he adds.

Sources confirm that yes, everyone was there, except the other 1,500 plus undergraduate students at the University.

“The party was lit,” said one of the officers Paul Ice. “It was a shame we had to bust the party, but I managed to swipe some delicious guacamole on the way out.”

Outside of Finnegan, the police saw a short man with red hair, a beard and a green sequined top hat prancing around the grassy fields.

“He did not look like a student, so we decided to investigate, which led to a full-fledged pursuit,” said Ice.

“Think ‘Fast and the Furious,’ but on foot instead of cars,” he adds.

Three police officers chased the dwarf-sized man, who they presumed to be leprechaun, all around campus.

“‘Fast and the Furious?’ More like kindergarteners on a goose chase,” scoffs senior Jen Eric.

After chasing the leprechaun around Labuda to Trexler and circling the Jesus statue approximately six times, the chase continued across the wide- open space of the McShea Mall.

This is where the police lost him.

“Small legs, fast runner,” explains another officer, Percy Veer.

The police continued to do a sweep of the Mall and found a black pot. It was heavy when the police picked it up.

“We thought it was filled with a gold,” said Veer. “A Saint Patrick’s Day miracle.”

However, upon opening the lid, they discovered black hunks of coal.

“Wrong holiday, again!” shouted Land.

The leprechaun has been causing havoc on campus for the past two weeks now by putting extra bacon on students’ cheeseburgers, adding money to students’ Paw Bucks accounts and slipping candy into backpacks.

Sightings of leprechaun should be reported to campus PD immediately. The mayhem must be stopped.

DeSales alumna Anne Gurtowski opens Apple Mill Bakery

Originally published in Issue 11, Fifty-First Year of The Minstrel (March 23, 2017). Click here to view the entire issue. 

Anne

Photo courtesy of Anne Gurtowski

After only a year and half after graduation, ’15 alumna Anne Gurtowski opened her own business Apple Mill Bakery in Cullman, Ala.

“The bakery was my pipe dream for a long time, and I always thought if it ever happened, it would be a long way off. I’m really grateful that I have to opportunity to do this now,” says Gurtowski. “God is very generous.”

Gurtowski majored in marketing at DeSales and always liked the idea of starting her own business.

“Having classes in subjects such as accounting, finance, management, marketing and business law, has helped me to have a well-rounded approach to the small business world,” says Gurtowski.

Before deciding on opening a bakery, Gurtowski considered other businesses, but says baking was always her dream and held importance to her at a young age.

“My grandma would let me help her bake from the time I was old enough to hold the spoon or put sprinkles on her cookies. I grew up helping both her and my mom bake,” she says. “My mom definitely inherited Grandma’s love of baking, and they both passed it down to me. Some of my best memories growing up are with them in the kitchen.”

Many of Apple Mill Bakery’s recipes are from Gurtowski’s Irish grandmother and some of her recipe cards are written in her grandma’s hand.

AppleMill

Apple Mill Bakery offers a wide variety of delicious homemade cookies including raspberry thumbprint, spritz, congo bars, and rugelach. Photo courtesy of Anne Gurtowski

Some of her grandma’s most iconic recipes include congo bars and crumbcake. Apple Mill Bakery’s cookie tins are the most popular item and are a great gift around the holidays. All of the bakery’s items are made from scratch and have no added preservatives.

“I think something is lost when food is made in large factories with a lot of added ingredients. The people element is missing,” says Gurtowski. “I want my customers to know that real people who care about what they do make the food.”

Before opening the bakery in November 2016, a lot of work and planning needed to be done. There are many health regulations that need to be met, accounts to set up, paperwork to file and construction of the commercial kitchen.

Gurtowski says opening a business was full of new challenges, but has advice for young entrepreneurs.

“Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you can’t open your own business; you’re too young and you don’t have the experience. Just try it. You’ll never know if it will work unless you try. It’s all a process and a learning experience.”

“I think it’s important to find what makes you happy in life and pursue it. Find a way to do what will make you feel fulfilled at the end of each day,” she adds.

Currently, Apple Mill Bakery is housed in a commercial kitchen, but Gurtowski is hoping to move into a full-fledge storefront in the future. Right now, business is mainly done on their Etsy, which can be reached at applemillbakery.com, and also local farmers’ markets.

This spring the bakery will widen the reach of local farmers’ markets, which are expanding and growing in popularity.

“People want to buy local, support small businesses, and know exactly where their food is coming from. It’s a good match for our commitment to fresh, made-from-scratch food,” says Gurtowski.

They are also looking into various wholesale opportunities, such as becoming a supplier to local restaurants.

As a small business owner, Gurtowski enjoys the variety and different hats she gets to wear.

“On Monday, I could be doing R&D [research and development] for new products. By the time Friday roles around, I’ve been a food photographer, lead marketing manager, and as always, head baker, which is my favorite role,” she says. “It’s a lot of work, but I wouldn’t change it.”

Gurtowski is thankful for her family who has been very involved in the process of opening Apple Mill Bakery and loves that she gets to share her passion with the rest of the world.

“Baking to me is an extension of family life,” she says. “Food brings people together.”

For DeSales students and alumni interested in purchasing from Apple Mill Bakery, use the code DSU10 for a special discount rate on applemillbakery.com.