Throw some glitter, make it rain: Kesha’s comeback with album “Rainbow”

Not knowing when Kesha would release new music again, animals were left to play her most recent 2012 album “Warrior” on repeat. After many battles in court with her longtime producer Dr. Luke, who Kesha has accused of sexual, physical, verbal and emotional abuse, a new album “Rainbow” finally dropped on August 11.

In order to avoid Dr. Luke, former CEO of Kemosabe records, as best as she could, Kesha did not work collaboratively with Dr. Luke but instead worked with other producers while he approved the music. Kesha still has to produce two more albums with Kemosabe Records until the contract is over.

Rainbow-Kesha-bia-album

Cover art for “Rainbow.” Photo courtesy of Wikipedia

“Praying” was the first single released off of “Rainbow,” a 14-track album. The piano ballad has emotional lyrics about finding strength after abuse and gives many listeners chills. The song features Kesha’s raw talent throughout and she hits an impressive high note after the bridge.

Kesha’s second single “Woman” featuring The Dap King Horns has fun and catchy lyrics that her animals have become accustomed to and acts as an anthem for women.

“I’m a motherfucking woman, baby, alright. I don’t need a man to be holding me too tight,” she sings in the chorus.

In an exclusive Rolling Stone essay about the song, Kesha writes, “It was such a beautiful experience to write such a strong female empowerment song with two men, Drew Pearson and Stephen Wrabel, because it reinforces how supportive men can be of women AND feminism.”

The album opens with “Bastards,”a tame, slow-sounding song with untame lyrics about not letting the assholes in life win. The song introduces the fact that this album is a result of all the hardship Kesha has dealt with for the past three years. Her life was all over the place and so is this album, so it’s not exactly the classic Kesha people were used to with past albums “Animal,” “Cannibal” and “Warrior.”

Mixed in with the pure pop songs are “Let ‘Em Talk” featuring Eagles of Death Metal, which gives a punk/rock n roll vibe while “Hunt You Down” and “Old Flames (Can’t Hold a Candle to You)” featuring Dolly Parton and is full of country tunes. “Old Flames” was actually written by Parton and Kesha’s mom, Patricia Sebert, in 1978.

Despite not quite sounding like a cohesive album, it shows off Kesha’s range of what she can do and is held together with cohesive messages. Kesha is learning to move on from her past in “Learn to Let Go,” “Rainbow,” and many other songs throughout the album.

“The past can’t haunt me if I don’t let it. Live and learn and never forget it,” she sings in “Rainbow’s” third single, “Learn to Let Go.”

She’s also looking on the bright side in life in “Boogie Feat,” another song featuring Eagles of Death Metal, and “Boots.”

“I’m walking on air, kickin’ my blues,” sings Kesha in “Boots.”

Overall, Kesha has made quite a comeback on “Rainbow” with new sounds and bold, inspiring lyrics.

Her “Rainbow” tour kicks off Aug. 19 through Nov. 1 with many locations already sold out of tickets. Find all her tour dates at Kesha Official.

Why Freeform’s “The Bold Type” is a must-see show for women

Freeform’s “The Bold Type” revolves around three friends, Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) who work at Scarlet, a young women’s magazine. It’s been called the “bubbly ridiculous dramedy you need this summer” by Vanity Fair and “100% fresh” by Rotten Tomatoes.

Reasons to love the show:

(Small spoilers episodes 1-6 ahead)

It’s loosely based on real life

The drama/comedy series is loosely based on Cosmopolitan and is inspired by Joanna Coles, who serves as one of the executive producers for “The Bold Type” and was the editor-in-chief of Cosmo from 2012-2016. She is currently the chief content officer of Hearst Magazines, which owns Cosmo and also Good Housekeeping, Food Network, HGTV magazine, Esquire and many more.

You can read Scartlet’s articles

In the first episode, Jane is starting her first day as a writer for Scarlet after working as an assistant for four years. In each episode Jane writes a new article and faces different challenges in her writing from interviewing a stripper and almost being sued to revealing she’s never had an orgasm. Jane’s articles can be read on Freeform as well as articles by Jane’s love-interest, Ryan, also known as “Pinstripe,” who works for a competing magazine.
Read Jane’s article “Never had an orgasm? Me neither” here.
Read Ryan’s article “Why girls fake it and do we care?” here.

The show teaches you to follow your dreams. . . 

Sutton, like Jane, also starts out at Scarlet as an assistant. She knows she needs to move up in her career and applies for an advertising job, but realizes her dream is fashion. She works twice as hard to prove she is capable of being a fashion assistant without any fashion school experience.

. . . while remaining realistic

When Sutton is offered the fashion assistant job, the pay is cheaper than her old assistant job. Although her salary is not negotiable, Sutton negotiates other benefits in order to have her dream job while still being able to live in New York City.

Diverse characters

Kat, who is Scarlet’s social media director, becomes romantically interested in Adena, who calls herself a “proud Muslim lesbian.” Adena is a perfect balance between sweet and strong, which instantly makes audiences root for her. She is just the character America needs with the anti-Muslim sentiment present today.

Additionally, by having characters like Kat, Adena, Alex (writer at Scarlet) and Steve (Sutton’s boss in the fashion department), “The Bold Type” opens up other imperative issues like racism and deportation.

Tough yet vital issues

In addition to the topics already mentioned, “The Bold Type” discusses online bullying, breast cancer prevention, legality issues, and more. Despite these serious topics and drama-filled situations, the show is also full of funny and light moments, romance and friendship that make it a joy to watch.

Friends that last a lifetime

The bond between Jane, Kat and Sutton is what everyone wishes their friendships were like. Would you dislodge a yoni egg from your friend’s vagina? Exactly.

Another endearing friendship in the show is between the editor-in-chief Jacqueline (Melora Hardin) and Jane and Kat. Some may have expected a harsher editor like Miranda Priestly (Meryl Streep) in “The Devil Wears Prada,” that audiences love to hate, but Jacqueline was a pleasant surprise. She is still a hardworking and intimidating boss; however, she genuinely cares about Jane and Kat by being supportive in what they do.

Lastly, but most importantly: feminism

Each episode revolves around feminism, or equality among men and women. Each of the six episodes aired thus far features Jane, Kat and Sutton standing up for themselves and topics they believe in. Whether they are negotiating salaries or launching a #FreetheNipple campaign, “The Bold Type” is truly inspiring, empowering and makes women want to take the “boldness” they see on screen and use it in their own lives.

Watch “The Bold Type” on Freeform, Tuesdays 9/8c.