Why Freeform’s “The Bold Type” is a must-see show for women

Freeform’s “The Bold Type” revolves around three friends, Jane (Katie Stevens), Kat (Aisha Dee) and Sutton (Meghann Fahy) who work at Scarlet, a young women’s magazine. It’s been called the “bubbly ridiculous dramedy you need this summer” by Vanity Fair and “100% fresh” by Rotten Tomatoes.

Reasons to love the show:

(Small spoilers episodes 1-6 ahead)

It’s loosely based on real life

The drama/comedy series is loosely based on Cosmopolitan and is inspired by Joanna Coles, who serves as one of the executive producers for “The Bold Type” and was the editor-in-chief of Cosmo from 2012-2016. She is currently the chief content officer of Hearst Magazines, which owns Cosmo and also Good Housekeeping, Food Network, HGTV magazine, Esquire and many more.

You can read Scartlet’s articles

In the first episode, Jane is starting her first day as a writer for Scarlet after working as an assistant for four years. In each episode Jane writes a new article and faces different challenges in her writing from interviewing a stripper and almost being sued to revealing she’s never had an orgasm. Jane’s articles can be read on Freeform as well as articles by Jane’s love-interest, Ryan, also known as “Pinstripe,” who works for a competing magazine.
Read Jane’s article “Never had an orgasm? Me neither” here.
Read Ryan’s article “Why girls fake it and do we care?” here.

The show teaches you to follow your dreams. . . 

Sutton, like Jane, also starts out at Scarlet as an assistant. She knows she needs to move up in her career and applies for an advertising job, but realizes her dream is fashion. She works twice as hard to prove she is capable of being a fashion assistant without any fashion school experience.

. . . while remaining realistic

When Sutton is offered the fashion assistant job, the pay is cheaper than her old assistant job. Although her salary is not negotiable, Sutton negotiates other benefits in order to have her dream job while still being able to live in New York City.

Diverse characters

Kat, who is Scarlet’s social media director, becomes romantically interested in Adena, who calls herself a “proud Muslim lesbian.” Adena is a perfect balance between sweet and strong, which instantly makes audiences root for her. She is just the character America needs with the anti-Muslim sentiment present today.

Additionally, by having characters like Kat, Adena, Alex (writer at Scarlet) and Steve (Sutton’s boss in the fashion department), “The Bold Type” opens up other imperative issues like racism and deportation.

Tough yet vital issues

In addition to the topics already mentioned, “The Bold Type” discusses online bullying, breast cancer prevention, legality issues, and more. Despite these serious topics and drama-filled situations, the show is also full of funny and light moments, romance and friendship that make it a joy to watch.

Friends that last a lifetime

The bond between Jane, Kat and Sutton is what everyone wishes their friendships were like. Would you dislodge a yoni egg from your friend’s vagina? Exactly.

Another endearing friendship in the show is between the editor-in-chief Jacqueline (Melora Hardin) and Jane and Kat. Some may have expected a harsher editor like Miranda Priestly (Meryl Streep) in “The Devil Wears Prada,” that audiences love to hate, but Jacqueline was a pleasant surprise. She is still a hardworking and intimidating boss; however, she genuinely cares about Jane and Kat by being supportive in what they do.

Lastly, but most importantly: feminism

Each episode revolves around feminism, or equality among men and women. Each of the six episodes aired thus far features Jane, Kat and Sutton standing up for themselves and topics they believe in. Whether they are negotiating salaries or launching a #FreetheNipple campaign, “The Bold Type” is truly inspiring, empowering and makes women want to take the “boldness” they see on screen and use it in their own lives.

Watch “The Bold Type” on Freeform, Tuesdays 9/8c.

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